Transforming sectors

How to maximize the impacts of investments in agriculture, social protection and women’s empowerment on nutrition?

Public-Private Partnerships and undernutrition: Examples and future prospects

In recent years, political commitment to reducing undernutrition has risen globally. Nutrition features prominently on development agendas, in prime ministerial speeches,
in international development discourse and in the media. The multisectorality of nutrition is better recognised with the corresponding need for engagement by multiple actors in different sectors and at different levels. While this has thrown a spotlight on the issue of private sector engagement in nutrition-relevant actions, looming over new initiatives that engage the private sector is a deeply suspicious nutrition sector.  This research brief from Transform Nutrition Public-Private Partnerships and undernutrition: Examples and future prospects examines this issue.

Agrobiodiversity and dietary diversity in Rongai sub-county, Nakuru

A research brief by colleagues at Egerton University, Kenya Agrobiodiversity and dietary diversity for improved nutritional status of mothers and children in Rongai sub-county, Nakuru is now available. The brief summarises the findings of surveys where the association between agrobiodiversity (the variety of all forms of life directly relevant to agriculture, including crop varieties and animal species) and diet diversity for children 6–23 months old and their mothers or caregivers were determined. We make recommendations on how the situation could be improved.

Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Programme

A new Transform Nutrition discussion paper is now out The impact of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Programme on the nutritional status of children: 2008–2012. Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Programme (PSNP) is a large-scale social protection intervention aimed at improving food security and stabilizing asset levels. In this paper, we examine the impact of the PSNP on children’s nutritional status over the period 2008–2012 and these findings, along with work by other researchers, have informed revisions to the PSNP.

Reducing chronic undernutrition in Ethiopia

On December 5th, 2016, Transform Nutrition Co-Research Director John Hoddinott, gave a seminar on issues surrounding chronic undernutrition in Ethiopia. In addition to reviewing current trends and the factors associated with these, Dr Hoddinott summarized Transform Nutrition research on chronic undernutrition in Ethiopia, conveying key messages and outlining areas requiring attention in the future. The lecture was attended by representatives from civil society organizations, academics, government officials and researchers. His presentation can be viewed here.

Children’s diets and access to markets in Ethiopia

Chronic undernutrition in Ethiopia is widespread and many children consume highly monotonous diets. To improve feeding practices in Ethiopia, a strong focus in nutrition programming has been placed on improving the nutrition knowledge of caregivers. In this new Transform Nutrition/ Ethiopia Strategy Support Programme working paper Children’s diets, nutrition knowledge, and access to markets , the impact of improving nutrition knowledge within households and its complementarity with market access is considered.

How do we harness the nutrition potential of social protection programs in India?

This blog by Kalyani Raghunathan, IFPRI  was previously posted on the POSHAN website.

The most recent data on India from the Rapid Survey of Children (2013-14) shows that there has been considerable improvement in undernutrition indicators in India in the 9 years that passed since the last round of available survey data, the 2005-06 National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3). However with almost 40% of children under the age of 5 still stunted, and almost 30% underweight, there is ample room for improvement. One of the ways in which this can be done is to use the vast array of social protection programs in India as platforms for delivery of nutrition-specific and sensitive interventions, as well as drivers of change in the underlying determinants of these indicators. [Read more...]